Working from the command area: Other Tools

This chapter contains other tools which can be executed from command area.

To start a task from the command area:

  1. Type a command and its parameters in your operating system’s command area (next to the command prompt) according to the command syntax described in the following chapters.
  2. Press Enter.

Note that lowercase letters in a parameter name are optional and need not be typed. A mixture between uppercase and lowercase letters is allowed. However, a muddled letter sequence like in OVerWRiTe must not be used. The parameters can be entered in any order whatever.

To process several commands in sequence, type the individual commands into a batch file (*.BAT or *.CMD) using any text editor. You can execute these commands by starting the batch file.

To avoid retyping of long text strings in commands, you can also type a command and its parameters in a text editor, which is capable of the Copy to clipboard function. You can then paste the text string from the clipboard directly into your system’s command area and start the task.

Contents

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How to read syntax diagrams

In this chapter diagrams are used to illustrate the programming syntax. To use a diagram, follow a path from left to right, top to bottom, adding elements as you go. In these diagrams, all spaces and other characters are significant.

Each diagram begins with a double right arrowhead and ends with a right and left arrowhead pair. Lines beginning with single right arrowheads are continuation lines.
Chap18 Figure 1.gif

Keywords are all in lowercase, but can be entered in uppercase or in lowercase. Variable values that you provide are shown in italics and are usually in lowercase. Where values are shown in uppercase, they should be entered as they appear.

In a choice of items, the default item is always shown above the main line:
Chap18 Figure 2.gif

Optional syntax elements are shown below the main line:
Chap18 Figure 3.gif

A repeat arrow shown above an item or a stack of items indicates that you can specify the item multiple times or specify more than one of the items. A character (such as a comma) on the repeat arrow line indicates that the items must be separated by that character. A repeatable operand is shown like this:
Chap18 Figure 4.gif

Syntax diagrams can be broken into fragments. A fragment is indicated by vertical bars with the name of the fragment between the bars. The fragment is shown following the main diagram, like so:
Chap18 Figure 5.gif

Converting a NLV memory to a source/source memory

Purpose

For the conversion of NLV Translation Memories (containing translated segments) to source/source Translation Memories OpenTM2 offers the command EqfCreateITMFromMemory. This tools reads a NLV memory and writes the segments of this memory to a new memory replacing the target of the segments with the segment source.

Format

Chap18 Figure 6.gif

Parameters
  • /INmem = inmemdb
inmemdb specifies the name of the NLV Translation Memory that you want to use as input Translation Memory.
  • /OUTmem = outmemdb
outmemdb is the name of a new Translation Memory which is to receive the convertes segments from the input Translation Memory The Translation Memory outmemdb is created by EQFCreateITMFromMemory.

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example show how to use the EqfCreateITMFromMemory command. Enter the EqfCreateITMFromMemory command as follows:
Example

EqfCreateITMFromMemory /inmem=nlv-mem /outmem=source-source-mem

In this example all segments contained in Translation Memory nlv-mem are written to the new output Translation Memory source-source-mem and the target of the segments is replaced with the source of the segments.

Creating an Initial Translation Memory from the command line

Purpose

If you need to create Initial Translation Memory (ITM) databases frequently, you might find it more convenient to use a command instead of the procedure described in Creating an Initial Translation Memory.

The correctness of the aligned segment pairs in an internal ITM can be checked with a text editor as described in The Initial Translation Memory editor or Revising an Initial Translation Memory.

When you consider the Initial Translation Memory to be correct, you can begin using it for your translations.

The EQFITM command has additional options compared to the window version:

  • You can create not only an internal Translation Memory, but also an external Translation Memory.
  • You must not fill the internal Translation Memory.
  • You can suppress the confirmation message.
Format

The following syntax diagrams describe how you create an initial Translation Memory from the Windows (R) command area. Note that lowercase letters in a parameter name are optional and need not be typed.
Chap18 Figure 7.gif
Notes

1 – Mandatory, but not filled if /TYPE=NOTM 
2 – Mandatory except for /TYPE=NOANA

Parameters
  • /SGMLFORMAT= format
formatspecifies the export format of a ITM. The default parameter is UNICODE. Other possible parameters are ANSII and ASCII. Shortform is /sf.
  • /MEm= memdb
memdb is the name of a previously created OpenTM2 Translation Memory (without the file extension). This Translation Memory can still be empty. It can be filled with original segments and their corresponding translations.
  • /FIles= file_pairs
file_pairs specifies the pair of files to use when creating the ITM. Enclose the pair of files in brackets and separate the file names by a comma.
If you specify several pairs (as original1, translation1, original2, translation2, and so on), enclose the file names in brackets and separate them by commas.
If you want to specify a list of pairs in a list file, refer to this list file by preceding the list file name with the @ symbol (@ list_file_name). In the list file enclose the file names in brackets and separate them by commas.
  • /MArkup= markup
markup is the name of the markup table that the selected texts use (mandatory except for /TYPE=NOANA). See Working with markup tables for the names of the markup tables.
  • /SGmlmem= mem_file
mem_file is the name you want to give to the external ITM and the path where it is to be located. The ITM is in SGML format and can subsequently be imported into OpenTM2 after you have checked it.
  • /SRclng= source_language
source_language is the language of the original documents.
  • /TGtlng= target_language
target_language is the language of the translated documents.
  • /SrcStartpath= source_startpath
source_startpath is the path information that you do not want to become part of the document name when the original document is stored in the Initial Translation Memory. For example, if your source file is stored in e:\tm\project\english and you do not want e:\tm\project to become part of the name under which it is stored, specify e:\tm\project in this field.
The path you specify here can differ from the target_startpath. However, if you specify a source start path, you must also specify a target_startpath.
  • /TgtStartpath= target_startpath
target_startpath is the path information that you do not want to become part of the document name when the target document is stored in the Initial Translation Memory. For example, if your source file is stored in e:\tm\project\english and you do not want e:\tm\project to become part of the name under which it is stored, specify e:\tm\project in this field.The path you specify here can differ from the source_startpath. However, if you specify a source start path, you must also specify a source_startpath.
  • /TYpe=
One or more of the following:
  • NOANA
Do not analyze the selected files because they have already been analyzed by OpenTM2 .
  • NOTM
Do not fill the internal Translation Memory (memdb). Fill the external Translation Memory. It is in SGML format and you can check it afterwards.
  • NOCONF
No confirmation message is displayed. This is useful if you do not want to be interrupted by progress messages while you are working.
  • PREPARE
The source documents are related to their corresponding translations. The file pairs are prefixed with p.
  • VISUAL
Creates the ITM and presents its contents on the screen for you to revise.

Examples

The following examples show how to use the EQFITM command.
Example 1

eqfitm /mem=wpitm /files=(d:\eng\text.doc,d:\ger\text.doc)
       /markup=eqfwp /srclng=English(U.S.) /tgtlng=German(national)

Note: For better readability, the command is shown on two lines here. However, it must be typed in one line.

In this example, the original WordPerfect document text.doc is located in the directory d:\eng\ . The German translation is located in the directory d:\ger\ . eqfwp is the name of the OpenTM2 markup table used for this document. All matching sentence pairs are put into Translation Memory wpitm . No external Translation Memory (SGML format) is created.
Example 2

eqfitm /mem=myitm /files=@itm.lst /markup=eqfami /sgmlmem=xx.out
       /type=notm /srclng=English(U.S.) /tgtlng=German(national)

Note: For better readability, the command is shown on two lines here. However, it must be typed in one line.

In this example, a Translation Memory myitm is used to find out the source language. The files to be analyzed are contained in itm.lst . itm.lst looks as follows:
itm.lst

(
d:\eng\text1.doc, d:\ger\text1.doc,
d:\eng\text2.doc, d:\ger\text2.doc
)

The ITM created is placed into an SGML Translation Memory named xx.out , not into myitm (because type notm is specified). The markup table to be used is eqfami because the documents were originally created with Ami Pro.

You must type the command in one line. You can type it in uppercase letters, lowercase letters, or mixed case. You cannot use any wildcard characters, such as asterisks (*).

Note: It is recommended to proofread the external ITM before using it in OpenTM2. Because it has not been created during translation, but consists of machine-generated matches, the alignment of original and translated segments might not be completely correct. This could be the case where two original segments have been combined into one translated segment.

Revising an Initial Translation Memory

Purpose

All matches placed in an Initial Translation Memory are indicated by an [m] prefix. It is recommended that you check the correctness of these matches before using them if you have not already done this using the Initial Translation Memory editor.

An alternative method to perform this check is to retranslate the original document now with OpenTM2, and to compare the sentences in the original document with the translation proposals from the Initial Translation Memory. For each sentence, you can either accept or reject the saved translation. If you accept the translation proposal, the [m] flag is removed. Translations you reject, however, retain the [m] flag. Finally, the EQFDMM command deletes all translations that still have the machine translation flag.

To check the correctness of a newly generated Initial Translation Memory, proceed as follows:

  1. Create a folder with the following properties:
    1. The name of the Initial Translation Memory as Translation Memory name.
    2. The same markup language that was used when creating the Initial Translation Memory.
    3. The same source and target language you used when creating the Initial Translation Memory.
    4. If you want to make changes while checking, select the appropriate dictionaries.
  2. Import only the original documents into the folder, not the target documents. Use the same original files that you used when creating the Initial Translation Memory.
  3. Open each document and perform the following tasks for all sentences:
    1. If there is an acceptable proposal for the current segment, displayed in the “Translation Memory” window, accept it by pressing Ctrl+n, where n is the number of the proposal you consider correctly translated. The source segment is replaced with the accepted target segment. Press Ctrl+Enter to store the translation of the segment now as a human translation that removes the [m] flagging and proceeds to the next segment.
    2. If you do not accept any of the displayed proposals, move the cursor to the text following the currently active segment (for example, by pressing Ctrl+End and moving the cursor to the right) and then press Ctrl+Enter.
  4. When you have reached the end of all documents, leave the Translation Environment.
  5. When you have checked the Initial Translation Memory based on all the documents that were used to create it, the Initial Translation Memory contains exact matches (the approved proposals) and machine-generated matches (the rejected proposals).
Format

The following syntax diagram describes how you remove all the rejected machine-generated matches from the Initial Translation Memory from the Windows (R) command area. Note that lowercase letters in a parameter name are optional and need not be typed.
Chap18 Figure 8.gif

Parameters
  • /MEm= memdb
memdbis the name of the previously created and checked Initial Translation Memory (without the file extension). All segments with the [m] flag are removed from this Translation Memory, all others remain unchanged.
  • /TYpe=NOCONF
NOCONF specifies that no confirmation message is displayed at the end of the process. This is useful when you do not want to be interrupted by a message.

When all machine-generated matches are removed from the Translation Memory, this is indicated by a completion message.

Examples

The following example shows how to remove all machine-generated matches from a Translation Memory called INTERITM.
Example

eqfdmm /mem=interitm

Reversing a Translation Memory

Purpose

OpenTM2 provides a command to reverse a Translation Memory. The reversed Translation Memory is saved in a new Translation Memory file. This means that the source language of the Translation Memory you want to reverse is turned into the target language. The target language of the reversed Translation Memory is now becoming the source language. This can be useful when you are working in a company which does translations from any to any languages. Or, when a document was initially written in English, translated into German, revised in German for a second release, and now must be translated back into English.

Format

The following syntax diagram describes how you reverse a Translation Memory from your system’s command area. Note that lowercase letters in a parameter name are optional and need not be typed.
Chap18 Figure 9.gif

Parameters
  • /MEm= memdb
memdb specifies the name of the Translation Memory that you want to reverse.
  • /REv= revdb
Specifies the name of the Translation Memory where you want to place the reversed Translation Memory specified in memdb.
  • /TYpe=NOCONF
No confirmation message is displayed. This is useful if you do not want to be interrupted by progress messages while you are working.

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example shows how to reverse a Translation Memory using the EQFREVM command.
Example

eqfrevm /mem=archive /rev=std1

In this example, the Translation Memory archive is reversed into the existing Translation Memory std1 .

Changing m-flagged segments

Purpose

Segments that were translated by machine are prefixed with an [m]. OpenTM2 provides a command to have these m prefixes removed from machine-translated segments in a Translation Memory. Alternatively, this command lets you add m flags to segments that did not have such a flag before.

Format

The following syntax diagram describes how you change the m flags in a Translation Memory with the EQFCMM command. Note that lowercase letters in a parameter name are optional and need not be typed.
Chap18 Figure 10.gif

Parameters
  • /MEm= memdb
memdb specifies the name of the Translation Memory that you want to work with.
  • /CLear=
Specifies whether you want to remove the m flags in the specified Translation Memory. This option is only required if you do not specify the SET option.
  • /SEt=
Specifies whether you want to add new m flags to segments in the Translation Memory specified. This option is only required if you do not specify the CLEAR option.
  • /TYpe=NOCONF
No confirmation message is displayed. This is useful if you do not want to be interrupted by progress messages while you are working.

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example shows how to change an m flag in a Translation Memory using the EQFCMM command.
Example

eqfcmm /mem=biotext /clear=yes /type=noconf

In this example, the m-flags that preceded the segments in the Translation Memory biotext are removed. You are not prompted with a confirmation message.

Specifying the quality of m-flagged segments

Purpose

Segments that were translated by machine are prefixed with an [m]. OpenTM2 provides a command to specify the quality of those translations.

You can specify a number between 0 and 101 for the quality. 101 stands for a perfect translation. The following translations, that is, the following aligned segments, get an m flag:

  • All aligned segments if you specify 101
  • The segments not reaching the specified quality level if you specify a number from 1 through 100
  • No segments if you specify 0

A quality of 100 is decreased by certain findings:

  • It is decreased by 1 if:
    • The source sentence contains less than 10 words and the target sentence more than 19
    • The source sentence contains more than 10 words but the target sentence is not even half as long as the source sentence
    • The source sentence contains more than 10 words but the target sentence is more than 1.5 times longer than the source sentence.
  • It is decreased by the number of alignments that do not match 1:1 in the current alignment nor the five alignments before and after the current alignment.
  • It is decreased by the number of differences between the source and target segment with respect to:
    • Numbers
    • Abbreviations
    • Words in uppercase characters only
    • The terms “F1”, “F2”, and so on
    • Formatting tags within a segment
Format

The following syntax diagram describes how to specify the quality of m-flagged segments with the EQFITM command. Note that lowercase letters in a parameter name are optional and need not be typed.
Chap18 Figure 11.gif

Parameters
  • /MEm= memdb
memdb specifies the name of the Initial Translation Memory you want to work with.
  • /FIles= document_name
document_name specifies the name of a document you want to work with. The document_name specification can include the drive and directory where the file to work with is located.
If you specify several documents, enclose the document names in brackets and separate them by commas.
If you want to specify a list of document names in a list file, refer to this list file by preceding the list file name with the @ symbol (@ list_file_name). In the list file enclose the document names in brackets and separate them by commas.
If you do not specify the FIles option, all documents in the folder are selected.
  • /MArkup= markup
markup is the name of the markup table that the selected texts use (mandatory except for /TYPE=NOANA). See Working with markup tables for the names of the markup tables.
  • /SGmlmem= mem_file
mem_file is the name and path name for the external ITM. The ITM is in SGML format and can subsequently be imported into OpenTM2 after you have checked it.
  • /SRclng=source_language
source_language is the language of the original documents.
  • /TGtlng= target_language
target_language is the language of the translated documents.
  • /SrcStartpath= source_startpath
source_startpath is the path name of the source documents.
  • /TgtStartpath= target_startpath
target_startpath is the path name of the translated documents.
  • /TYpe=
One or more of the following:
  • NOANA
Do not analyze the selected files because they have already been analyzed by OpenTM2.
  • NOCONF
No confirmation message is displayed. This is useful if you do not want to be interrupted by progress messages while you are working.
  • NOTM
Do not fill the internal Translation Memory (memdb) but the external Translation Memory. It is in SGML format and can be checked.
  • VISUAL
Creates the ITM and presents its contents on the screen for you to revise.
  • PREPARE
The source documents are related to their corresponding translations. The file pairs are prefixed with p.
  • /QuaL= quality_level
A number between 0 and 101 specifying the quality level of an alignment. If you omit this parameter, m-flags are added to all alignments unless you specify /TYPE=VISUAL.

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example shows how to specify the quality of m-flagged segments using the EQFITM command.
Example

eqfitm /fi=(us\a1.txt, ger\a1de.txt) /me=a1 /ma=EQFBOOK /SR=English(U.S.)
/TG=German(national) /SS=D:\kbt\itm /TS=D:\kbt\itm /TY=(VISUAL) /QL=99

In this example, you request that all alignments with a quality level of less than 99 are m-flagged.

Changing the markup, target language and date of segments

Purpose

OpenTM2 enables you to change the markup language, the target language or the date of segments stored in a Translation Memory.

Format

The following syntax diagram describes how you change the markup, target language or date of segments with the EQFTMT command. Note that lowercase letters in a parameter name are optional and need not be typed.
Chap18 Figure 12.gif

Parameters
  • /MEm= memdb
memdb specifies the name of the Translation Memory that you want to work with.
  • /FromMarkup=
frommu is the name of the markup language to be changed. The name can contain wildcard characters. For example, /FROMMARKUP=IBM* would change all segments with a markup starting with . If this parameter is omitted, the markup language of all segments is changed. This parameter can also be used to restrict the number of segments being changed when changing languages or segment dates. If specified without the /ToMarkup parameter only segments from the specified markup will be changed.
  • /ToMarkup=
tomu is the new markup language to be used for either the segments with markup language frommu or all segments if the /FROMMARKUP parameter is omitted.
Note: When the markup language of segments has been changed the tool performs an organize of the memory at the end of the processing. This ensures that the memory lookup works correctly after a change of the markup language.
  • /FromLang=
fromlang is the name of the target language to be changed. The name can contain wildcard characters. For example, /FROMMARKUP=Eng* would change all segments with a target language starting with Eng. If this parameter is omitted, the target language of all segments is changed.
  • /ToLang=
tolang is the new target language to be used for either the segments with target language fromlang or all segments if the /FROMLANG parameter is omitted.
  • /DAte=
newdate is the new date to be set for the segments. The format of newdate is YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS. The time part (HH:MM:SS) is optional. You can also specify an asterisk (“*”) as newdate, which instructs EQFTMT to use the current system date as segment date. For example, /DATE=2001-01-01 would change the segment date of all changed segments to the 1st January 2001.
  • /DOC=
Using this parameter the changed segments can be restricted to segments from document document. The name can contain wildcard characters. For example, / DOC=A* would change all segments from documents starting with the letter A.
  • /TYpe=NOCONF
If you specify this parameter, no confirmation message is displayed. This is useful if you do not want to be interrupted by progress messages while you are working.
If you do not specify this parameter, the “Change Markup and Target Language” window is displayed.
This window contains the following information:
  • The name of the Translation Memory
  • The number of the current segment
  • The number of segments whose markup was changed
  • The number of segments whose target language was changed
  • The number of segments whose date was changed
At the end of the process, you get a completion message showing the number of segments processed and changed.

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following examples show how to change the markup or language of segments using the EQFTMT command.
Example 1

eqftmt /mem=mymem /frommarkup=eqfami /tomarkup=eqfhtml4

In this example, the markup table of the Translation Memory mymem is changed from Ami Pro (<tt> eqfami ) to HTML ( eqfhtml4 ).
Example 2

eqftmt /mem=mymem /fromlang=English(U.S.) /tolang=German(national)

In this example, the target language is changed from English to German.
Example 3:

eqftmt /mem=mymem /doc=A* /date=*

In this example, the date of all segments from documents starting with the letter A in the Translation Memory mymem is changed to the current system date.

Removing segments with identical source and target strings

Purpose

OpenTM2 enables you to remove segments which have the same source and target string from a Translation Memory. Whitespace characters such as linefeed, carriage return and space are ignored when checking the source and target string. For security reasons the segments are not removed from the input Translation Memory but a new Translation Memory is created which contains all segments from the input Translation Memory except for the segments having the same source and target string.

Format

Chap18 Figure 13.gif

Parameters
  • /MEm =inmemdb
/MEm inmemdb specifies the name of the Translation Memory that you want to use as input Translation Memory.
  • /OUt =outmemdb
outmemdb is the name of a new Translation Memory which is to receive all segments from the input Translation Memory except for the segments having the same source and target string. The Translation Memory outmemdb is created by EQFTMCL.
If you do not specify this parameter, the “Change Markup and Target Language” window is displayed. This window contains the following information:
  • The name of the Translation Memory
  • The number of the current segment
  • The number of segments whose markup was changed
  • The number of segments whose target language was changed
At the end of the process, you get a completion message showing the number of segments processed, the number of skipped segments, and the number of segments written to the output Translation Memory.

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example show how to use the EQFTMCL command.

Enter the EQFTMCL command as follows:
Example

eqftmcl /mem=mymem /out=mymem-cleaned

In this example all segments contained in Translation Memory mymem are written to the new output Translation Memory mymem-cleaned except for segments having the same source and target string.

Removing inline tagging from an external memory

Purpose

OpenTM2 enables you to remove inline tagging from the segments in an external (= exported memory). For security reasons the segments are not updated inplace but a new memory is created containing the processed segments.

Format

Chap18 Figure 14.gif

Parameters
  • /MEm = inmemdb
/MEm inmemdb specifies the fully qualified name of the external Translation Memory that you want to use as input Translation Memory.
  • /INTYPE= intype
intype specifies the format of the input memory and can be ASCII, ANSI, UTF16 or TMX
  • /OUTMEM = outmemdb
outmemdb is the fully qualified name of a new external Translation Memory which is to receive all segments from the input Translation Memory with the inline tagging removed.
  • /OUTTYPE= outtype
outtype specifies the format of the output memory and can be ASCII, ANSI, UTF16 or TMX or INTERNAL (to create an internal memory instead of an external)
  • /MARKUP= markup
markup specifies the markup to use for the recognition of inline tagging. The special value RTF can be used to remove pure RTF tagging from the segments, using the standard markup table EQFRTF will also remove HTML like tags beside the pure RTF tags. If not specified the markup information of the segment itself is used for the inline tag recognition.

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example show how to use the EQFREMOVETAGS command.

Enter the EQFREMOVETAGS command as follows:
Example

eqfremovetags /inmem=c:\mymem.tmx /intype=TMX /outmem=c:\mymem-cleaned.exp
/outtype=UTF16 /markup=EQFRTF

In this example all segments contained in Translation Memory mymem are written to the new output Translation Memory mymem-cleaned except for segments having the same source and target string.

Showing the contents of exported folders

Purpose

OpenTM2 enables you to remove inline tagging from the segments in an external (= exported memory). For security reasons the segments are not updated inplace but a new memory is created containing the processed segments.

Format

Chap18 Figure 15.gif

Parameters
  • folderfile
folderfile specifies the fully qualified file name of an exported folder (FXP)
  • /DETAILS

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*)

Examples

The following example show how to use the SHOWFXP command.

Enter the SHOWFXP command as follows:
Example

showfxp c:\folders\showme.fxp

In this example all segments contained in Translation Memory mymem are written to the new output Translation Memory mymem-cleaned except for segments having the same source and target string.

Restoring vital Translation Manager property files

Purpose

This tool may be used to restore vital OpenTM2 property files or to correct corrupted property files. Please contact TM-SUPPORT to get more information how to correct corrupted property files.

Format

Chap18 Figure 16.gif

Checking the folder history data

Purpose

OpenTM2 collects all processing steps and count information for a folder in a history log file. This history log file is the base for the creation of calculation reports. The tool CHKCALC can be used to verify that the folder history log file is not corrupted.

Format

Chap18 Figure 17.gif

Parameters
  • /FLD = folder
folder specifies the name of a Translation Manager folder which is to be checked
  • /HLOG= histlog
histlog specified the fully qualified file name of a history log file to be checked
  • /FXP = fxpfile
fxpfile specified the fully qualified file name of an exported Translation Manager folder
  • /ALL
The /ALL switch tells the tool to check the history log information of all Translation Manager folders

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example show how to use the CHKCALC command.

Enter the CHKCALC command as follows:
Example 1

 chkcalc /fld=showme

In this example the history log information of folder showme is checked.
Example 2

chkcalc /all

In this example the history log information of all folders is checked.

Correcting the drive letter information of Translation Manager files

Purpose

Many OpenTM2 files contain drive letter information. When these files are copied from one machine to another or to antother drive the files can not be used anymore and are shown as marked as defect in the OpenTM2 list windows. The tool EQFADL corrects the drive letter settings of the specified file so that the files can be processed as usual.

Format

Chap18 Figure 18.gif

Parameters
  • /FOL= folder
folder specifies the name of a Translation Manager folder whose drive letter settings will be corrected
  • /MEM= mem
mem specifies the name of a Translation Memory whose drive letter settings will be corrected
  • /DIC= dictionary
dictionary specified the name of a dictioanry whose drive letter settings will be corrected

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example show how to use the EQFADL command.

Enter the EQFADL command as follows:
Example

eqfadl /fol=showme

In this example the drive letter of the folder showme and the drive letter of all of its documents is corrected.

Converting TM SGML memory databases into TMX format

Purpose

OpenTM2 enables you to remove inline tagging from the segments in an external (= exported memory). For security reasons the segments are not updated inplace but a new memory is created containing the processed segments.

Format

Chap18 Figure 19.gif

Parameters
  • Inmem
is the fully qualified file name of the input memory in TM SGML format (This name can contain wildcard characters)
  • outmem
is the fully qualified file name of the output memory in TMX format, when no output memory name is specified the input memory name is used as output memory name with the extension changed to TMX
  • /INMODE = im
im specifies the encoding of the input memory and can be UTF16, ASCII, ANSI or the number of a codepage. The input mode has to be specified only when the memory is not encoded in UTF16 and does not conatin the <codepage> tag in the header.
  • /OUTMODE= om
om specifies the encoding of the output memory and can be UTF8 or UTF16, When not specified UTF8 is used as default

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example show how to use the EXP2TMX command.

Enter the EXP2TMX command as follows:
Example

exp2tmx c:\memory\*.EXP

In this example all EXP memory databases located in folder c:\memory are converted into the TMX format, the output memory name will be the input memory name with an extension of TMX and the encoding of the output memory will be UTF8.

Converting external Memory databases from the TMX format into the EXP format

Purpose

For the memory interchange with other tools the memory interchange format TMX is widely used. The TMX2EXP tool can be used to convert TMX Translation Memory databases into the OpenTM2 specific EXP format.

Format

Chap18 Figure 20.gif

Parameters
  • inmem
inmem specifies the name of the external Translation Memory in EXP format that you want to convert, the name may contain wildcards (e.g. C:\MEMS\*.EXP) to convert a group of files in a single run
  • outmem
outmem is the name of the converted Translation Memory in EXP format. If no name is specified the name of the input memory is used with the file extension changed to .EXP.
  • /OUTMODE= om or /OM= om
om specifies the encoding of the output memory and can be UTF16, ASCII, or ANSI.
  • /CLEANRTF
if specified any RTF inline tags are removed from the segments of the memory
  • /SOURCESOURCE or /SS
if specified the source of the memory matches is also used as the target text thus creating a source-source memory
  • /MARKUP= mu or /MA= mu
if specified the source of the memory matches is also used as the target text thus creating a source-source memory

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example show how to use the TMX2EXP command.

Enter the TMX2EXP command as follows:
Example

tmx2exp *.TMX /outmode=UTF16 /CLEANRTF

In this example all Translation Memory databases with an extension of .TMX will be converted into the EXP format and the encoding of the converted memories will be UTF-16, all RTF tagging contained in the segments will be removed.

Changing the type of an exported folder

Purpose

Exported OpenTM2 folder can be master folders, child folders or standard folders. When exporting a master folder it is automatically exported as a child folder when not specified otherwise. The tool CHANGEFXP can be used to change the type of the exported folder whithout requiring a new export of the folder.

Format

Chap18 Figure 21.gif

Parameters
  • folderfile
folderfile is the fully qualified name of the exported folder, if no file extension is specified “”.FXP”” is used as default
  • /TYPE=type
type is the new type of the folder and can be MASTER, CHILD, or STANDARD
  • /PW =password
password specifies the folder password for MASTER or CHILD folders

Note: You can type the commands in uppercase, lowercase, or in mixed-case letters. You may not use any wildcard characters, such as an asterisk (*).

Examples

The following example show how to use the CHANGEFXP command

Enter the CHANGEFXP command as follows:
Example

changefxp c:\showme.fxp /TYPE=MASTER /PW=verysecret

In this example the exported folder SHOWME.FXP is converted into a master folder, the password is “verysecret”
Example

changefxp c:\master.fxp /TYPE=STANDARD

In this example the folder master.fxp is converted into a standard TM folder